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 hereAmerica celebrates the Fourth of July each year with food, fun and, of course, fireworks! But while you’re out having fun, don’t forget about your bird. Loud noises and bright flashes of light can stress out most birds. Follow these tips to keep your bird as stress-free as possible here.

 hereAmerica celebrates the Fourth of July each year with food, fun and, of course, fireworks! But while you’re out having fun, don’t forget about your bird. Loud noises and bright flashes of light can stress out most birds. Follow these tips to keep your bird as stress-free as possible here.

Filed under happy independence day fourth of july parrots pet birds

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We asked bird owners if they read to their birds and 46% of them said yes! Do you read to your bird? Does your bird have a favorite story? Don’t forget to take our latest poll at www.BirdChannel.com.

We asked bird owners if they read to their birds and 46% of them said yes! Do you read to your bird? Does your bird have a favorite story? Don’t forget to take our latest poll at www.BirdChannel.com.

Filed under birds parrots

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America celebrates the Fourth of July each year with food, fun and, of course, fireworks! But while you’re out having fun, don’t forget about your bird. Loud noises and bright flashes of light can stress out most birds. Follow these tips to keep your bird as stress-free as possible here.

America celebrates the Fourth of July each year with food, fun and, of course, fireworks! But while you’re out having fun, don’t forget about your bird. Loud noises and bright flashes of light can stress out most birds. Follow these tips to keep your bird as stress-free as possible here.

Filed under fourth of july happy independence day parrots birds

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biomorphosis:

Scarlet Macaws are one of the most intelligent bird species. When in captivity, they are able to mimic words and sounds and learn tricks. They are said to have the intelligence of a 4-8 year old child with the emotional intelligence of a 2 year old. This means that they can be demanding and cranky and even throw temper tantrums if not given proper attention.

biomorphosis:

Scarlet Macaws are one of the most intelligent bird species. When in captivity, they are able to mimic words and sounds and learn tricks. They are said to have the intelligence of a 4-8 year old child with the emotional intelligence of a 2 year old. This means that they can be demanding and cranky and even throw temper tantrums if not given proper attention.

(via animalsandlandscapes)

Filed under scarlet macaws birds parrots

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coelasquid:

I always thought it was kind of interesting that male eclectus parrots are ostensibly foliage coloured while the females are bright scarlet and blue. It has been suggested by scientists observing the extremely territorial behaviour of females guarding their tree hollows that the bright plumage is more of a warning beacon to other females to show that tree is taken than anything to do with camouflage or attracting mates.

All hollows are in bright light, and females usually sit at the entrance with their heads and chests glowing like beacons. Their bright red color acts as an obvious signal to other females, saying in effect “This hollow is occupied.”

The male, however, has to be camouflaged because he’s the one collecting food while the female sits in the nest for months at a time, even after the chicks are fully grown, to protect it from being stolen by other females.

Like coelasquid points out, color is everything to Eclectus. The article that the post links to is one of the only articles that explains why male and female Eclectus look so different. As the author writes:

Few birds have puzzled scientists more than the Eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus). One of the 20th Century’s great evolutionary biologists, the late Professor Bill Hamilton of Oxford University, used to show a slide in his lecture series of a male and female parrot sitting side by side. The male was a vibrant green, and the female a stunning vermilion. Whereas evolutionary theory had plenty to say about why one sex in birds is often larger or more gorgeously colored, it stumbled somewhat in establishing what had happened in this species. No other bird has sexes so “beautified,” but in such different ways. Hamilton ended his talk by saying, “When I understand why one sex is red and the other green, I will be ready to die.”

coelasquid:

I always thought it was kind of interesting that male eclectus parrots are ostensibly foliage coloured while the females are bright scarlet and blue. It has been suggested by scientists observing the extremely territorial behaviour of females guarding their tree hollows that the bright plumage is more of a warning beacon to other females to show that tree is taken than anything to do with camouflage or attracting mates.

All hollows are in bright light, and females usually sit at the entrance with their heads and chests glowing like beacons. Their bright red color acts as an obvious signal to other females, saying in effect “This hollow is occupied.”

The male, however, has to be camouflaged because he’s the one collecting food while the female sits in the nest for months at a time, even after the chicks are fully grown, to protect it from being stolen by other females.

Like coelasquid points out, color is everything to Eclectus. The article that the post links to is one of the only articles that explains why male and female Eclectus look so different. As the author writes:

Few birds have puzzled scientists more than the Eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus). One of the 20th Century’s great evolutionary biologists, the late Professor Bill Hamilton of Oxford University, used to show a slide in his lecture series of a male and female parrot sitting side by side. The male was a vibrant green, and the female a stunning vermilion. Whereas evolutionary theory had plenty to say about why one sex in birds is often larger or more gorgeously colored, it stumbled somewhat in establishing what had happened in this species. No other bird has sexes so “beautified,” but in such different ways. Hamilton ended his talk by saying, “When I understand why one sex is red and the other green, I will be ready to die.”

Filed under eclectus parrots animals

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Good News: Ecuador Amazon Parrot Declared New Parrot Species Bad news: There are only around 600 left.
What you need to know:

• The Ecuador Amazon (Amazona lilacina) was considered a subspecies of the red-lored Amazon (Amazona autumnalis).
• While other subspecies of A. autumalis primarily live in lowland forests, the Ecuador Amazon parrot relied on mangroves and dry forest. This difference in habitat made researchers wonder if this was a different parrot species altogether.
• Mark Pilgrim, the director general of Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom, led a study of the Ecuador Amazon parrot, and determined it was its own separate species.
• The red-lored Amazon has a population of 5 million, while the Ecuador Amazon has as few as 600 members.
• The new species, A. lilacina, will be officially announced in Spring 2014.

Read more here.

Good News: Ecuador Amazon Parrot Declared New Parrot Species

Bad news: There are only around 600 left.

What you need to know:

• The Ecuador Amazon (Amazona lilacina) was considered a subspecies of the red-lored Amazon (Amazona autumnalis).

• While other subspecies of A. autumalis primarily live in lowland forests, the Ecuador Amazon parrot relied on mangroves and dry forest. This difference in habitat made researchers wonder if this was a different parrot species altogether.

• Mark Pilgrim, the director general of Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom, led a study of the Ecuador Amazon parrot, and determined it was its own separate species.

• The red-lored Amazon has a population of 5 million, while the Ecuador Amazon has as few as 600 members.

• The new species, A. lilacina, will be officially announced in Spring 2014.

Read more here.

Filed under parrots animals